Tag Archives | support

Under pressure: The relationships of UK parents who have a child with a learning disability

It’s clear that good quality relationships are central to our health and wellbeing. At Relate, we know this directly from our work in the counselling room and online, as well as from the wealth of research evidencing this. Our landmark The Way We Are Now survey of the UK’s relationships, provides an important window into the health of our relationships. Today we’re publishing the latest report from this series of research reports – Under pressure: The relationships of UK parents who have a child with a learning disability. It examines these parents’ relationships with each other, their families, friends, and wider social networks, and compares these with the relationships of parents who do not have a child with a learning disability. Learning disability is often not well-understood, and little previous research has looked at the pressures on parents’ relationships. Relate and Relationships Scotland were therefore pleased to partner with learning disability charity Mencap to produce this report. Sadly, it doesn’t make for easy reading. Our data shows that parents who have a child with a learning disability often experience unnecessary strains on their relationships. These strains are over and above the pressures which any relationship may come under, this can result in…

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‘The Relationship’ – a poem

I heard this poem read recently at a wedding and I thought it perfectly describes a good relationship. It also relates to people who are single who know what it is like to hold up the ceiling alone. It’s entitiled AMARRIAGE but I feel it could be for everyone. A MARRIAGE By Michael Blumenthal You are holding up a ceiling with both arms. It is very heavy, but you must hold it up, or else it will fall down on you. Your arms are tired, terribly tired, and, as the day goes on, it feels as if either your arms or the ceiling will soon collapse. But then, unexpectedly, something wonderful happens: Someone, a man or a woman, walks into the room and holds their arms up to the ceiling beside you. So you finally get to take down your arms. You feel the relief of respite, the blood flowing back to your fingers and arms. And when your partner’s arms tire, you hold up your own to relieve him again. And it can go on like this for many years without the house falling.

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